The Burning Question.
The Burning Question.
The Burning Question. – A short film by Adrian Bautista

I found this beautiful paragraph written by Chelsea Fagan through a friend and I am sure many will relate to what Fagan has written:

“So you look at your life, and the two countries that hold it, and realize that you are now two distinct people. As much as your countries represent and fulfill different parts of you and what you enjoy about life, as much as you have formed unbreakable bonds with people you love in both places, as much as you feel truly at home in either one, so you are divided in two. For the rest of your life, or at least it feels this way, you will spend your time in one naggingly longing for the other, and waiting until you can get back for at least a few weeks and dive back into the person you were back there. ” – Chelsea Fagan

About a week ago I also shared a status from my Facebook page giving a little tease of what I’m currently planning for the year ahead.

Having spent majority of my life living abroad (UK – 12 years, Brunei – 6 years, Nepal – 4 years), I can understand how its very easy to lose the connection with Nepal and in a way, feel alienated from the place where you came from or where your parents called home. That is now a bigger thing especially for the many young Nepalis growing up in the UK and I do not blame them. I am currently working on a pretty Lexciting project for Summer 2014 (set to take place in August) and for my ‘idea’ to be a reality, I am after determined, driven young Nepalis from the UK. I can’t wait to share more in the coming weeks! If the idea of doing something memorable in Nepal next year sounds Lexciting to you then watch this space and of course, don’t spend too much on Christmas presents . – lexlimbu

I’m pretty excited about the project ahead and look forward to sharing this experience with people from near and far; more in few weeks! Also – if you guys want to read about Singapore born Nepalis adjusting to a ‘somewhat’ foreign life in Nepal then click here (the article was from 2009). While we’re on the topic of Where’s Home, check out this pretty interesting 9 minute short film “SO WHERE’S HOME” by Adrian Bautista.

Now that I live in London, I do not get as much where are you from questions but living outside of London meant that question pretty much expected a random country thrown in there. I would and still say, I was born in Nepal but grew up here in the UK. Sometimes I stretch that and say grew up in Brunei and the UK. Nevertheless, I am very grateful for the two years I spent in Nepal – seeing the country firsthand and being taught some valuable life lessons at Kathmandu International Study Centre.

So Where’s Home For You?

Read More:
Will I Go Back?

2 COMMENTS

  1. What you’ve said is really true. I have spent 13 years in Nepal and 5 years in UK. And already I feel alienated with my country and its customs. But I’m determined to go back once I finish my studies. Jay Nepal.

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